The History and Style of Golf Fashion

Have you ever wondered why golfers dress the way they do? What makes each golfers look stand out from the rest? Let’s dive into the fashion of the past and some of the crazy styles currently!

In the early 19th and 20th centuries golfers would wear knickers or short pants that ended below the knee and heavy tweed jackets. Their ensembles would also include starch shirts, neckties and matching tweed caps. Golf wear was meant to show authority and wealth, and the more formal the outfit the more money you had. Sometimes these jackets were brightly colored to warn passersby of flying golf balls. As the years went on the tweed jacket switched to a cotton single-breasted jacket because of the heat, and the knickers moved on to flannel trousers. They were often white or gray since men usually went golfing after a day at the office. Around the 1930s, Neckties were no longer worn. By the 1940s the heat was becoming unbearable and the styles of today’s golf wear were introduced. Men wore short-sleeved knitted shirts and lightweight slacks similar to today’s age.

Women’s fashion back in the day was the opposite of light and comfortable. Women in the 19th and 20th century were not allowed to play golf as a competitive sport but only as a leisure activity. Victorian golf dresses included crinolines, bustles, and multiple petticoats not to mention heels. With all those layers it was not easy to get a swing in! It wasn’t until the 1920s that woman could have fewer layers while golfing. They were allowed to wear a single layer skirt cut below the knee and stocking with a suit style jacket. Golf shoes for women were still not invented, and in many photographs, they were still shown wearing heels. 1933, was the first time women were seen wearing trousers on the course. It was considered incredibly scandalous and didn’t become common dress until the 1960s.

In today’s age, most golf courses require men to wear a collared shirt, and women must wear a similar style, but they are not required to have a collar. Pants should long and made out of a cotton or polyester or shorts with a pleated or flat front. Traditional workout clothes are not permitted on most golf courses for both men and woman. Footwear is an essential part of the game; the shoes should have spikes on the sole. Many courses require a soft spike made out of plastic or rubber to not damage the course. Hats are not required, but are worn by most golfers to protect them from the sun! Baseball caps and visors are the most popular on the course, but there are no formal rules on golf headwear.

Now a day’s golf fashion is trendier than ever! With major fashion houses designing stylish options, and companies like Loud Mouth Golf making funky alternatives to the traditional look, you can style your look on the course in some many different ways! Regardless of what you wear on the course let us take care of the cleaning afterward!

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What’s up with Dryer Sheets?

Dryer Sheets: How they’re Made and Why we use them.

You use them every laundry day, but do you really know why? Are dryer sheets doing anything to your clothes or just a force of habit? Let St Croix Cleaners break it down from the beginning.

Dryer Sheers were invented in the late 1960s, by Conrad Gaiser and his wife Audrey.  They lived on the top floor of an apartment duplex with the laundry all the way on the ground floor.  Audrey would have to run at the last minute to get the fabric softener in the load before it dried completely! Conrad, who worked in the cleaning industry for quite some time wanted to make things easier on his wife.  He applied fabric softer to a piece of scrap fabric and named his creation the Tumble Puff.  (Source: C&EN)  He sold his invention to Proctor & Gamble in 1969 and after a few changes, it became known as the Bounce dryer sheet we see in stores today!

Now, what are they really doing to your clothing?  For the most part, dryer sheets break down the static electricity in clothes.  When two materials rub together like a sweater & a top they can build up an electrical charge.  This can cause the loss of electrons from one fabric to another.  With too few electrons the items get a positive charge, and with too many, the garment gets a negative charge.  As the saying goes  “Opposites Attract” therefore the two garments stick together.  Dryer Sheets prevent this process from happening by balancing the electrons with positive ions.  They also reduce the soap residue that may be left on the garments from washing.  When soap residue is left on the garments, soap eventually breaks down the fibers, giving your clothes a shorter lifespan.

How are dryer sheets made? They start off as a non-woven polyester material coated with a softening agent and fragrance.  There is very little difference between brands, usually only the surfactant that is used is different.  A surfactant is a compound of fatty acids that contains a positive charge.  (Source: ACS) Some dryer sheets may also contain a calcium clay, this just protects your clothing from getting any stains from the fabric softener on the dryer sheet if it releases the surfactant to early!

If you don’t want to use a dryer sheet, the best way to reduce the electricity is take your clothes out of the dryer before they dry completely.  Water is an excellent conductor so it gets rid of the charge before it can build up.  There are also lots of recipes online for homemade dryer sheets that are a bit softer on your clothes and the environment for those not wanting to use the store bought dryer sheet.

Whether you use a dryer sheet for just the laundry, for everything from the kitchen sink, or not at all, the dryer sheet has a long and interesting history! The laundry world is always coming up with new things, we can’t wait to see where the future of dryer sheets will take us!

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116 Year Old Heirloom Restored

Customer Heather MacLeod remembers seeing this dress for the first time when she was just a little girl. Pulling it from its box, she was immediately attached to its history and sentimental value to her family.  It’s typical for garments over 100 years old to be in less than ideal storage conditions, which can sometimes make cleaning/restoring much more difficult. This heirloom, dating back to 1899 was clearly in more favorable storage conditions making it easier to restore. The before and after pictures speak for themselves:

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What is the background story of the woman in the dress? Mary Ella McIntosh grew up in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. On December 27, 1899 at age 27, she married British-born James Paris Scott (age 33). They settled in James’ home in Massachusetts, and later had one child – a daughter, Elaine, born in August 1914.

When was the first time you saw the dress? I remember my grandmotherMary Ella’s daughter, Elaine – showing me the dress when I was a young child; I was probably about six years old the first time I saw it. After that, she was willing to show it to me any time I asked (at least a few times a year). When she passed away in 1992, the dress was passed to me.

Why did you decide to get your great grandmothers wedding attire cleaned? The dress had been in the attic for many years, and fortunately remained in very good condition. But I realized that a dress that was 116 years old needed proper cleaning and packaging in order to prevent degradation.

Why did you bring your great grandmothers wedding attire to a member of the Association of Wedding Gown Specialists? It was important to find someone who could be trusted to clean an antique dress without doing any damage. Treasured Garment Restoration did a fantastic job of cleaning the dress, and packing it appropriately so that it will last for many years to come.

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Duane, the Treasured Garment Specialist who worked on this dress, says “With older dresses that have oxidized so much over time, it’s sometimes a mystery what color the dress truly was, but with this dress we were able to really brighten it up and restore it. [You can see that this dress was constructed using 2 very different fabrics—1) cotton linen, which restored all the way back to its original color, and 2) silk (the trim) which will brighten a bit, but usually will not restore completely back to its original color.) ] Since this dress is over 100 years old we had to be careful to make sure we didn’t distort any of the fibers in the process. We carefully test all fabrics to make sure we’re using the right process with them. This is especially important to ensure the longevity of the dress for years to come.”

It’s truly an honor for our team at Treasured Garment Restoration to restore garments such as this dress.
We find joy in taking items that mean so much to our customers and restoring them to their original beauty. Our goal is to preserve garments so they last for years to come and can be passed down for generations.

If you have a wedding dress or other vintage garment you’d like us to take a look at– contact us!

 

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Stain Tips to AVOID

While the internet has useful tips on just about everything, some of their stain removal tactics are a recipe
for disaster. In many cases, using home remedies can cause a stain to become worse and tougher to
remove. So we’re here to share what stain removing methods you should avoid when treating stains from home:

Stain removing sticks: The reason we advise against these is because they often contain either bleach
or some kind of alcohol that can pull the color from the fabric. Instructions on these sticks usually suggest
rubbing the stain. Doing so can cause more problems for your stain. It can result in the stain just
spreading and becoming harder to remove.

Hairspray, Nail Polish Remover, Toothpaste: These are all household products that have one
thing in common—Alcohol. Again, alcohol isn’t great for your clothes. It often results in color loss or
staining your garment. As a general rule if you are going to try to get the stain our at home, check the
ingredients listing.  If you’re not sure, bring the garment to us and our team of experts will take a look!

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Fashion Trends Summer 2015

Summer 2015 trends approach with a little bit of the old and lots of the new. Your dry
cleaning team at St Croix Cleaners keeps up on the latest cleaning trends and care for specialty designs and fabrics.
We stay prepared to clean just about anything!  Fashion can be hard to keep up with!
Below are a few of the top 5 trends we’re seeing lately:

1. Kimono
From loose fitting festival styled to a delicate, sheer Kimono jacket, this movie inspired look has
hit the runways in a number of variations.

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2. Bold Reds
Stand out of the crowd with a bold red. It looks incredible on all skin tones and
buying a red dress will never go out of style.

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3. Polka Dots
Polka dots are definitely one of the 2015 trends and this year they’ve come back bigger and better.
Polka dots can also be tricky when it comes to cleaning –due to the multi-patterned colors.
Be sure to read care labels and follow cleaning instructions carefully.
When in doubt, bring the garment to your local trusted dry cleaner

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4. White Lace
Another elegant trend coming down the catwalk is delicate white lace.
Lace is breathable and great to wear on hot summer days.
This one we recommend dry cleaning no matter what the care label states.
If not cleaned properly the lace can become distorted, torn, discolored and look worn fast.

white-lace-fashion-trend-spring-summer-2015 5. Gingham
This pattern can be worn in a variety of ways and is very chic this season!

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Laundry Detergent 101

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So what’s exactly in the laundry detergent you use at home?
Do you know that producers of detergents aren’t required to list exact ingredients?!
Clothes were not designed to be washed in perfumes or colored detergents.
We’ve
had customers bring in garments that have literally been dyed from the coloring
some
laundry detergent products use. 

We like to play it safe here at St Croix Cleaners and only use ecofriendly cleaning solvents
and soaps
.When you receive your garments back you won’t smell any fruity fragrance
or nasty chemical smell. There should only be a fresh clean scent.

All of our soaps used in our laundry and wet-cleaning processes are scent
and color free
, leaving your clothes softer to the touch. For at home use
we suggest using non-fragrance, color free detergents too!

Most of your favorite brands will carry some version of this.

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Storing Winter Garments

Spring is here! The snow is finally melting and it’s time to swap out the winter gear for those fresh spring looks.
Before we get too eager, it’s important to prep your garments for storage.
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 The first step is cleaning. The reason we clean items before storage is because any dirt or stains have the potential to become
bigger problems when left untreated for an extended period of time.
We often see garments come in that have stains that sat untreated all year, which makes them difficult to remove.
Some stains are easily forgotten about and can cause major problems on your garments. For instance, say you spilled some clear soda on your sweater and when it dried you couldn’t see it anymore.
Even though the stain has “disappeared”, you still have sugar and other chemicals that hide. Once they oxidize, it’s common for them to turn a yellowish/brown color. As mentioned above, the longer a stain goes untreated, the harder it is to remove. So even if it comes to our attention during the dry cleaning process, we still can have our experts
work on it rather than having it sit all year and turn into a much worse stain.

A huge mistake many of our customers make is storing items in the plastic you receive your garments back in. Storing your garments in plastic can cause discoloration if left for too long!
We suggest promptly removing the plastic bag when you get home.

Our favorite tip when tucking your clothes away is instead of using moth balls, try the skin of your favorite citrus.
They need to be changed periodically but you completely avoid the moth ball smell and instead are greeted by a citrus scent.

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Valentine's Stains

Every holiday comes with its own assembly of tough stains. Valentine’s Day is no exception to that rule.
With the celebration of friendship and love comes the chocolate, strawberry, lipstick, candle, and pollen stains.
But if you’re in a pinch and don’t have time to get your garment to the cleaners,
we’re here to help with some methods that can come in handy.
Keep in mind all these suggestions do depend on the type of fabric the garment is made of.
These methods are safe on cotton, however may not be successful on fibers like silk or rayon.
So proceed with caution. If you’re ever unsure, bring it to us and we can get our experts working on it.

1. Chocolate

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Whether it’s truffles, fudge, or cake, chocolate always seems to find its way on to your whitest top. The best way to approach this stain is to immediately flush it out with warm water.  Then, create a solution of water with a small amount of dish soap and blot (dont rub) the stain. The dish soap breaks down the oils in the chocolate and prevents the stain from setting.

2. Strawberry or Red Wine

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Both strawberries and grapes contain plastic elements in them. So when you get a stain, you want to prevent it from setting. We suggest flushing this with COLD water first. Using an ice cube, go over the stain in a circular motion. Then continue by blotting the stain and again, repeat using the ice cube. Continue this process and slowly the stain should pull out. Sometimes a solution of dish soap and warm water may help; however, these stains are very tough to get out. If you can’t seem to get it, bring it in to us while the stain is still saturated. Once the stain dries, its harder for us to get it out.

3. Candle Wax

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Place a thin terry cloth towel on top of a wax stain. Then gently iron over the top of the towel – this will pull the stain right out. The terry cloth acts like a sponge and absorbs the wax as you iron it.

4. Flower Pollen

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This is the trickiest of them all. Pollen is literally a dye that is used to color treat fibers. So when you get some on your clothes, it’s hard to get out. We suggest bringing this one straight to our team. Whatever you do, do not attempt to rub this one. By rubbing or trying to brush the pollen off your’re simply deepening the stain. Rubbing can also damage the fabric itself.

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Third Generation Dress

Here at St Croix Cleaners and Treasured Garment Restoration we’re lucky enough to hear
many great stories behind some of the garments we have coming in.
Recently, we received a third generation dress to redesign and restore for a Twin Cities Bride.

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We had the chance to get the full story from the brides mother (pictured above on the right) who worked with Darcy Zeppernick, our Treasured Garment Restoration Wedding Alteration & Design Certified Wedding Specialist.

“Each generation has modified how the headpiece and veil were worn. In 1962, my mother said she never liked how far forward she wore the headpiece and the line of jewels that dangled on her forehead. In 1987 the veil was completely replaced (it didn’t age well). I had to purchase a hoop slip since it was not saved from ’62. This year (2014), my daughter removed the poof and reversed the direction of the veil so she could wear it backwards. She wore the same hoop slip that I wore in 1987. We both noticed how much larger the hoop must have been in 1962.

What I like is that even though it is a vintage (timeless in my opinion) dress, each bride was able to make it uniquely hers by modifying how the veil was worn. Although my mother’s parents bought the dress for her and they were able to see me wear it, they passed before they could see their great granddaughter wear the dress. I know they would have been very pleased!

We learned from Darcy that people used to dance differently compared to now-a-days. People didn’t use to dance with their hands and arms over their heads like they do today so our daughter had to keep that in mind when she wanted to “raise the roof!”

I have one more daughter that may want to wear the dress so it will be preserved for her and any future generations.”-Jeanne Giles

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We love to hear the history of the pieces we’re cleaning. If you have a piece you’ve been meaning to get restored, let us know! We can help make your item look its best and be preserved for years to come.

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120 Years of Cleaning Service

This year celebrates our 120th year in business. As one of the oldest cleaners in the Midwest, help us celebrate!
We have a rich history of serving customers using top of the line methods to ensure a great product.

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Pictured above is out ELK location in St. Paul. Which was once owned by
White Way Cleaners until St Croix Cleaners acquired them in 2010.

Though we don’t deliver garments by horse and buggy anymore, we do pride ourselves
on the 120 years of experience we have gained.

Until the 1930s the dry cleaning process was limited to large central plants with delivery routes into all parts of the city. In 1935 the grandson of the original founder of Despatch developed the concept of the “package plant” or neighborhood dry cleaning store. He is credited nationally as the originator of the dry cleaning store concept. The first one in the country was a White Way, which he opened in south Minneapolis.

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