Common Sense Rules for Summertime Storage

Now that winter is over, it’s time to store away all those winter clothes until next season. Follow these simple rules to keep your winter fashions looking good season after season.
•Wash and dryclean everything before storage. Some stains that are now invisible may darken with age. Dirt and food are also invitations to insects.

• Make all necessary repairs—sew sagging hemlines, replace missing buttons, and fix split seams— before cleaning and storing for the season.

•Store all items in a cool, well-ventilated area. Hot attics, damp basements, and garages are to be avoided.

•Store away from natural and artificial light. A cool, dark closet is a good location for storage. Store woolens in cedar chests or other airtight containers. Second choices for storage are cloth or canvas bags and cardboard boxes. If you store your garments in a closet, drape a cloth sheet over your clothes to protect them from dust and light. Do not store leathers, furs, and woolens in plastic. Plastic encourages moisture, which can create mildew.

•Pack airtight containers (other than cedar chests) with mothballs suspended above or separate from the clothes—never place mothballs directly on the clothes. Cedar blocks or chips also discourage moths.

•To decrease wrinkles in sweaters, fold them and wrap in white tissue paper before storing. If you hang your sweaters, fold over the cross bar to avoid shoulder stretches. Down, like all winter clothing, should be cleaned (either washed or drycleaned according to the care label) before storage. Down should be stored loosely to allow for air circulation.

•Furs should be stored on a wellpadded hanger in a cool, dark place, ideally with a professional fur storage company or a St Croix Cleaners with fur storage capacity.

•If you do not have proper storage space, ask us about box storage. You can get your clothes cleaned and properly stored all at the same time.

 

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FAQs

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN **DRY CLEAN ONLY** AND **DRY CLEAN**

When reading the instructions found on care labels, we often see the phrase “dry clean” or “dry clean only.”  Many people believe that these instructions are interchangeable, but that is not true.  There is typically a difference between fabrics, and more care is often needed for clothing marked “dry clean only.”

“Dry Clean Only”
A garment that is marked as “dry clean only” is made of material that demonstrates a tendency to deteriorate when cleaned by any other method.  It’s a clear warning to the consumer that no other cleaning method should be used if they wish to maintain the integrity of the garment and allowing it to be useable after the cleaning process.

“Dry Clean”
The purpose of the “dry clean” designation is to give the option of some sort of hand cleaning/washing and drying for the garment at home.   This designation is used when the fabric involved has been demonstrated to hold it’s shape, color and not likely to change if cleaned by hand washing and air drying at home.  The “Dry Clean” designation is intended to convey that gentle cleaning methods other than dry cleaning may be acceptable.   At the same time, there is still risk in doing them at home and the best method is to dry clean the garment professionally.

–IF IT SAYS DRY CLEAN, CAN YOU CLEAN IT AT HOME?

Garments with care labels that say Dry Clean or For Best Results Dry Clean AND are made of natural fabrics like cotton, linen, cashmere and even some silks – may be done at home with a little extra care and patience.  AVOID or use caution if doing this with synthetic blends (rayon, viscose, acetate, etc.)

—HOW DO YOU CLEAN IT?

This depends on the fabric type.

* Keys to cleaning are: hand wash cycle (minimal agitation)

* NO extraction (spin) cycle used at all

* Air Dry/Fluff Cycle or hang to dry or dry flat (no heat)

* Reshaping may be required with some garments

For example a 95% cotton blazer with 5% Lycra a that has a care label that says “Dry Clean” could be done at home on a gentle hand washing cycle in cold water.  Avoid any extraction cycle (because of the Lycra and use an air fluff (no heat) cycle to dry it or hang dry.

Cashmere – would be similar –  a hand cleaning cycle with minimal agitation and no spin or extraction process– lay flat on a towel to dry (no tumbling) and reshape

–WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO GET THE STAIN OUT? BLOT? DAB? RUB?

Blot, Dab or Tap … NEVER EVER rub and avoid “wiping”

—IS THERE A STAIN A DRY CLEANER CAN’T REMOVE?

Yes, sadly there is.  While we love being the Super Stain Fighting Heroes – there is a stain or two that a dry cleaner may not be able to fully remove without possible damage to the garment (usually can get it to lighten).

It depends on a number of factors including:

  • Fabric type (delicate fabrics may not be able to handle certain stain removal techniques w/out risk/ damage)
  • Nature of the stain
  • How long the stain has been there
  • Any treatments already tried
  • Home remedy attempts often make a dry cleaner’s job more challenging
  • The knowledge and skill of the stain remover

Example:  curry sauce spilled on a sheer silk garment with unstable dyes in the silk fabric meaning that color on the fabric may be pulled would be difficult to fully remove. Why? Curry is a natural dye. Silk is a porous fabric and naturally soaks up and adheres stains, dyes to the fiber.

Example:  ground in dirt / tar on the hemline of a silk dress (wedding, long dress or formal) may be difficult to fully remove (some “shadowing” may be left when inspected closely)

Example: Coffee w/cream that had club soda poured over it – while it may flush out some of the coffee color – the club soda acts almost as a shilac over the acidic part of the stain and sets it in.

Another truth is…A dry cleaner may not always be sure if they can get it out until they are able to give it a try.

–ARE THERE ITEMS THAT SHOULDN’T GO THROUGH THE DRY CLEANER?

That may depend on your dry cleaner but typically no.  Most full-service dry cleaners utilize both dry and wet clean cleaning methods as well as wash and fold (laundry) services.

Even if the item says do not dry clean (example many down coats say this on their care labels) – your dry cleaner can STILL clean it!  We simply use a special wet cleaning method to clean the coat instead.  Even if the item says Spot Clean Only – your dry cleaner can take care of this for you.

We  see everything from cushions, costumes, Prom dresses, drapes to dog beds and doll clothes and more!

–HOW OFTEN DO YOU RECOMMEND COMMON ITEMS GOING TO THE DRY CLEANER?

IN PARTICULAR, MEN’S SUITS, WOMEN’S FORMAL DRESSES

SUITS

How often you should dry clean really depends on how often you wear the garment and how well you take care of it between getting it cleaned.  If you only wear your suit 2 times a year and only for a few hours at a time and do not spill anything on it, you don’t need it cleaned as frequently.  However, if you wear the same suit at least once a week – we recommend cleaning it every 3-4 wears to keep it looking it’s best.  And of course if you spill anything on it – bring it in right away to be treated!

FORMAL DRESSES

Pretty much the same as above…it depends on how careful the wearer of the dress was when they wore it.  You may be able to get up to 4 wears out of it before needing to clean it.  Some formals after one wear have beverages spilled on them, the hems look like they danced in the parking lot all night and there are visible perspiration stains!

If there are no spills, no major perspiration or deodorant marks (which can cause color fade and fabric to weaken)… then you’re probably ok to just hang that lil black dress till the next time you need to wear it and just steam / iron out the wrinkles (or take it on for a professional press only in between wears).

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5 Tips for Storing Summer Clothes

The first day of fall is nearly here, and soon we’ll be trading our shorts and sundresses for warm coats and cozy sweaters.   Here in the midwest, we often store our summer clothes for  6 months (or more!).  Having to pack away our summer wear can involve more than just tossing them into storage bins and shoving them under the bed.

 

Tip #1 Proper Care

Take the time to properly care for your clothes before storing them and they’ll last you for years to come…plus you’ll also be less likely to have to deal with nasty pests like moths, which can eat holes through sweaters and other fabrics – which you won’t see until after they’re cleaned next year!

Tip #2 Sort

Sort through your clothes first to decide what stays or goes.  This is a great time to create your “donate” pile and dispose of or recycle any clothes that are ripped or torn that you don’t plan to mend.  Other items to consider removing from  your wardrobe would be anything that doesn’t fit properly, clothes you’ve fallen out of love with, unworn items, and clothes that don’t make you feel amazing.

Tip #3 Clean Everything

Before you pack those summer clothes away, it’s important to clean everything. Not only does this keep your smelling and looking fresh (dirt left on clothes can leave permanent stains over time).  Cleaning everything prevents unseen moths and other pests from taking up residence.

As you sort through the clothes you’re keeping, separate out the hand-wash and dry clean only items and your regular laundry items in another.  Be sure to clean and care for the remaining clothes according to the care label instructions.

Tip # 4  Fold

After you’ve cleaned the garments you want to keep and store, fold and stack your items from heaviest (on the bottom) to lightest (on the top).  This will help keep your fabrics from developing too many creases.  If you want to help keep fabrics from creasing, you can put a layer of acid free tissue paper between the folds of each garment.

Tip #5 Protect & Store

There are a number of options when it comes to storing clothes.  For short term (6 months or less) storage – plastic storage bins work well, cedar chests or an old suit case.  The one material to avoid would be cardboard.  It’s a natural attractant for pests.

It’s also important that you protect your clothes during storage.  Be sure the storage container you’re using is clean and dry and free of any dirt or bugs.  Place your folded clothes in the container.  Be careful not to stack in there too tightly.  You want air to be able to circulate around the garments.  Place a layer (or two) of acid free tissue paper over the top of the clothes in each storage bin.  You can also toss in a cedar block or sachet on top of the acid free tissue – just be certain the cedar doesn’t come in direct contact with your clothes

If you have a garment you wish to hange for storage.  Use a thicker, padded hanger to avoid indenting or creasing the shoulders.  Cover the garment with a clean cotton or linen sheet to help protect it during storage.

Be sure to keep your stored clothes in a dry, cool location away from direct light and heat.  Closets or under your bed are good options.

Happy packing!

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Fashion Trends Summer 2015

Summer 2015 trends approach with a little bit of the old and lots of the new. Your dry
cleaning team at St Croix Cleaners keeps up on the latest cleaning trends and care for specialty designs and fabrics.
We stay prepared to clean just about anything!  Fashion can be hard to keep up with!
Below are a few of the top 5 trends we’re seeing lately:

1. Kimono
From loose fitting festival styled to a delicate, sheer Kimono jacket, this movie inspired look has
hit the runways in a number of variations.

screen-shot-2012-03-25-at-2-05-57-pm

2. Bold Reds
Stand out of the crowd with a bold red. It looks incredible on all skin tones and
buying a red dress will never go out of style.

The-Bold-Red-Dress-e1418243880370
3. Polka Dots
Polka dots are definitely one of the 2015 trends and this year they’ve come back bigger and better.
Polka dots can also be tricky when it comes to cleaning –due to the multi-patterned colors.
Be sure to read care labels and follow cleaning instructions carefully.
When in doubt, bring the garment to your local trusted dry cleaner

Spring-summer-2015-fashion-trends-polka-dots-dolce-and-gabbana-carnation-dresses

4. White Lace
Another elegant trend coming down the catwalk is delicate white lace.
Lace is breathable and great to wear on hot summer days.
This one we recommend dry cleaning no matter what the care label states.
If not cleaned properly the lace can become distorted, torn, discolored and look worn fast.

white-lace-fashion-trend-spring-summer-2015 5. Gingham
This pattern can be worn in a variety of ways and is very chic this season!

Oscar-De-La-Renta

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Storing Winter Garments

Spring is here! The snow is finally melting and it’s time to swap out the winter gear for those fresh spring looks.
Before we get too eager, it’s important to prep your garments for storage.
tumblr_inline_n1lbb7znvU1r6zr9i

 The first step is cleaning. The reason we clean items before storage is because any dirt or stains have the potential to become
bigger problems when left untreated for an extended period of time.
We often see garments come in that have stains that sat untreated all year, which makes them difficult to remove.
Some stains are easily forgotten about and can cause major problems on your garments. For instance, say you spilled some clear soda on your sweater and when it dried you couldn’t see it anymore.
Even though the stain has “disappeared”, you still have sugar and other chemicals that hide. Once they oxidize, it’s common for them to turn a yellowish/brown color. As mentioned above, the longer a stain goes untreated, the harder it is to remove. So even if it comes to our attention during the dry cleaning process, we still can have our experts
work on it rather than having it sit all year and turn into a much worse stain.

A huge mistake many of our customers make is storing items in the plastic you receive your garments back in. Storing your garments in plastic can cause discoloration if left for too long!
We suggest promptly removing the plastic bag when you get home.

Our favorite tip when tucking your clothes away is instead of using moth balls, try the skin of your favorite citrus.
They need to be changed periodically but you completely avoid the moth ball smell and instead are greeted by a citrus scent.

lemon-peel

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Valentine's Stains

Every holiday comes with its own assembly of tough stains. Valentine’s Day is no exception to that rule.
With the celebration of friendship and love comes the chocolate, strawberry, lipstick, candle, and pollen stains.
But if you’re in a pinch and don’t have time to get your garment to the cleaners,
we’re here to help with some methods that can come in handy.
Keep in mind all these suggestions do depend on the type of fabric the garment is made of.
These methods are safe on cotton, however may not be successful on fibers like silk or rayon.
So proceed with caution. If you’re ever unsure, bring it to us and we can get our experts working on it.

1. Chocolate

peanut-butter-filled-milk-chocolate-hearts-126241

Whether it’s truffles, fudge, or cake, chocolate always seems to find its way on to your whitest top. The best way to approach this stain is to immediately flush it out with warm water.  Then, create a solution of water with a small amount of dish soap and blot (dont rub) the stain. The dish soap breaks down the oils in the chocolate and prevents the stain from setting.

2. Strawberry or Red Wine

 red-wine-imgembed

Both strawberries and grapes contain plastic elements in them. So when you get a stain, you want to prevent it from setting. We suggest flushing this with COLD water first. Using an ice cube, go over the stain in a circular motion. Then continue by blotting the stain and again, repeat using the ice cube. Continue this process and slowly the stain should pull out. Sometimes a solution of dish soap and warm water may help; however, these stains are very tough to get out. If you can’t seem to get it, bring it in to us while the stain is still saturated. Once the stain dries, its harder for us to get it out.

3. Candle Wax

Candle wax

Place a thin terry cloth towel on top of a wax stain. Then gently iron over the top of the towel – this will pull the stain right out. The terry cloth acts like a sponge and absorbs the wax as you iron it.

4. Flower Pollen

roses

This is the trickiest of them all. Pollen is literally a dye that is used to color treat fibers. So when you get some on your clothes, it’s hard to get out. We suggest bringing this one straight to our team. Whatever you do, do not attempt to rub this one. By rubbing or trying to brush the pollen off your’re simply deepening the stain. Rubbing can also damage the fabric itself.

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Diamond Awards 2014

Congratulations to our Treasured Garment Restoration team for winning the
Mpls St Paul Magazines Diamond Award for Outstanding Bridal Preservation
This is a huge honor for us and we would like to thank everyone that voted for us!

“The expertise with which this eco-friendly company cleans your gown was not lost on our panel of judges. Their museum-quality preservation process and impressive customer services were an added bonus. Said one judge: “Brides can rest easy knowing that their precious gown is in good hands.”

See other winners of the Diamond Awards here and visit our Treasured Garment Restoration
page to click through a gallery of other preservations we’ve done in the past.


Diamond Award Judges Choice Diamond Award People Choice

Capture

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Stubborn Stain Tips!

Kare11 - Still

WATCH: Kare11 – Stubborn Stain Tips

 

 

 

 

 

Kelley Nemec from St. Croix Cleaners joined us with the dirt on stains and how to get rid of them. Here are some of her top tips.

Nylon sock: Deodorant’s worst nightmare

Rub the nylon sock lightly over the deodorant marks or foundation to remove the top layer of the stain before it blends into the fabric.

You can still wear the garment for the day, but make sure to clean it soon after, as remnants of the stain may still remain.

Dish soap: Grease’s toughest competitor

Create a solution with the following: 1 pinky’s dip worth of dish soap (the original Dawn works the best!) + 1 to 2 cups water

Flush the stain with this solution (do not just use straight dish soap). Then dab, do not rub, the stain.

Flush with water once more.

If the garment will still not come clean, bring it to the professionals!

Ice cubes: Red wine remover

Treat a red wine stain immediately by placing a paper towel under the garment’s stain Gently dab an ice cube on the top After a few minutes, place a paper towel on top of the stain and pull the stain away!

Vacuum brush: Increases longevity of your garments

Next time you’re vacuuming, take an extra few minutes and vacuum your clothes with a vacuum brush.

Dust finds its way into your closet and settles on your clothes, causing fume fading (color loss) of colored garments and browning of white garments.

By removing this dust, your garments will store and keep their color much longer.

AVOID using stain sticks or DIY stain removing tips found on the Internet. Every stain and fabric is different and some of these “fixes” can actually damage your clothing!

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Quick Fix For Chap Stick Stains

Ever forget to check and miss that chap stick
that’s hidden at the bottom of the pocket before putting your clothes in the washer or dryer?
We’ve seen more than our fair share of stains due to grease and chap stick come through our doors.
Some of these stains can be taken care of right at home! They often look similar to the image shown below. The fabric will appear darker and splotchy.

Chapstick
For a quick fix at home, try laying a piece of cardboard or paper bag under the stain and using a hot iron, go over the stain. The cardboard or paper will act like a sponge and absorb the grease or wax (depending on the brand). Its best to catch the stain before putting it in the dryer because the heat can cause the stain to set.

When all else fails bring it to us and our team will work on the stain!

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Grass Stains

In honor of the world coming together in the world cup games in Brazil, we thought we might remind you on how to remove the notorious grass stain.

Grass contains chlorophyll which is the substance that makes plants green. The green is what you see on the surface of this stain. Bleach can work great on white items however use caution with this because sitting in bleach too long can cause damage to the fabric. If the garment is not able to withstand bleach, try soaking it in a solution of water and detergent, then gently brush or dab the area. Be sure not to rub the stain because that may cause the stain to spread. After, wash the item. Before drying it be sure to check the stain is gone. Drying a stain such as this can cause the stain to set and make it very difficult to get out.

The quicker you deal with the stain, the better chance you have of getting it out.

When all else fails and the stain is a bit stubborn to get out at home. Bring it to us and our experts can work on getting the stain out.

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